“You bet!” or “You betcha!” – English expression of the week

“You bet,” or more colloquially, “You betcha,” is an expression used by English speakers to mean, “Of course!” Example: Sally asked Rebecca if she would like another chocolate chip cookie, to which the hungry Rebecca replied, “You betcha!” Sally promptly handed her a cookie.

Train Your Brain: How to Start Thinking in a Foreign Language

Interesting article shared below: We’ve all heard that thinking in a foreign language is a sign of real fluency. But I bet you haven’t heard that it’s the fifth key language skill that all learners must develop—falling right in line with speaking, listening, reading and writing. But is thinking really a skill? Yes, yes it is. (read more…

Interesting Article: “Social English Secrets: 5 Techniques to Get You Talking”

Interesting article share by Ryan Sitzman from: http://www.fluentu.com/english/blog/social-english/?utm_source=FluentU+Language+Learning+Tips+and+Updates&utm_campaign=870a8c75d7-English+Learner+Weekly_12_11_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ee7f81dbad-870a8c75d7-91809681 An excerpt from the post: Think back to the first time you spoke English in a real, authentic social situation. What was it like? Were you nervous? What did you talk about? How did you start the conversation? Did you tell a joke? Did you try to make…

English expression of the week: “a bitter pill to swallow”

The English expression this week is “a bitter pill to swallow.” Definition: A situation or information that is unpleasant but must be accepted. Example: Despite their excitement for Christmas, the children realized that there remained 2 weeks of school before the winter break. This was a bitter pill for them to swallow when they looked…